Office Hours: TTh 12:30-1:30 p.m., and by appointment, Gregory 154

Class Meeting Time: TTh 9:30-10:45 a.m., Henkel 107

Thursday, September 5, 2013

[Archive] Character Identification

Great work in class this week, literature scholars! You worked in groups to identify different types of characters in a set of short stories. You defined and identified round, flat, static, dynamic, protagonist, antagonist, foil, stock, and caricature characters in "A&P," "How to Talk to Girls at Parties," "A Rose for Emily," "The Story of an Hour," and "Hills Like White Elephants." As promised, here are the lists that you made on the walls in the classroom:








Wednesday, May 15, 2013

[Archive] Student Work Showcase and Congratulations to Brooke Hahne


Classmate Brooke Hahne wrote and performed the following poem at a Shenandoah student talent show in February. The same poem later won the 2013 Link Student Poetry Writing Contest Award. The poem is an interpretation of Edgar Allen Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado," which we studied in class this semester. According to Brooke, "it's from the POV of Fortunato, so it's a bit different." Take a read, below, and congratulate Brooke the next time you see her!

Cask of Dreams Forgotten: A Tribute

An Interpretation and Analysis of Edgar Allan Poe’s, “The Cask Of Amontillado”

By Brooke Hahne

There’s a light. There’s a light at the end of the tunnel,
But it’s disappearing and I fear I’ll never find my way back.
He led me down the catacombs then…
Left me with a cask, that was all.
And he left me in the dark, dusty dwelling I now call my grave.

So alone and afraid was I, that
The wall he built seemed to be closing in around me,
I was hallucinating, No…
It was closing in around me.
He was surrounding me with dry, decaying bricks and bones
of Paris past.

The dust, the dust and mortar were choking me. Killing me.

He left me with a cask of Amontillado,
That upon drinking I thought would sustain my life
Yet was full of his malicious immortality and
My delicious desires for a feeble friend.
I thought we’d leave together,
Yet he left me. Alone and afraid. Choking me. Killing me.

I, in turn, became the dust which killed me.

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Thursday, March 7, 2013

[Archive] Call for Writing Contest Submissions

Attention undergraduate student writers! The Shenandoah University English Department invites submissions of original poetry and short stories for the annual S. Gordden Link Poetry and Bruce C. Souders Fiction Writing Contests. Each contest prize is $250. Submission deadlines for both writing contests: extended to March 18.

Poetry entries may consist of no more than five poems. Short stories may be no longer than 5,000 words. Students who submit manuscripts must be enrolled full-time (at least 12 credit hours) at Shenandoah during both semesters of the 2012-13 school year. Submitted manuscripts must be unpublished in any other form. Each entry should identify the writer on only the cover sheet to ensure anonymity until judging is complete. The English faculty will judge all submissions and its decisions are final. Submit one typed copy of each entry to Jo Strader in the Office of Arts & Sciences located in Henkel Hall, Room 206, or via email at jstrader@su.edu. Contact Associate Professor of English Joanne Jacobs at jjacob2@su.edu for more information.

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

[Archive] Ceremony Assignment for Wednesday, 2/27/13

Photo: Native American Literature

We have discussed the relationships among healing, ceremony, and storytelling in Laguna/Pueblo culture. We will continue exploration of these links in writing today.

Assignment: In a two- to three-paragraph comment to this post, answer this prompt: in Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony, Betonie says, "White people are only tools that witchery manipulates; and I tell you, we can deal with white people. . . . because we invented white people" (122). What does Betonie mean by "witchery"? What does he mean by the claim "we invented white people"? Finally, what is the nature of Betonie's relationship with Tayo?

You will begin work on this very short essay in class today; you may finish at any time prior to the deadline posted below. Use standard English. Cite textual evidence from Silko's novel. Remember: summarize or paraphrase most evidence and quote only when the exact phrasing is unique or especially important. Your comment may respond to previous comments as long as it otherwise fulfills these assignment criteria. Citation includes in-text citation and a list of Works Cited. See the citation link on this blog for instructions. This assignment counts as one participation grade and is due by midnight on 2/28/13.

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

[Archive] Want to Recognize an Exemplary SU Teacher?

Has an SU professor helped you expand your learning? Made a difference in your life? Taught you to view the world in a new way? If so, why not nominate that professor for an Exemplary Teaching Award? For the past 20 years, the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry (GBHEM) has presented The Exemplary Teacher Award each year to one SU faculty member. This year’s award will be presented at the Commencement Ceremony on Saturday May 11, 2013.

Specific criteria are determined by Shenandoah University within the following broad general guidelines: excellence in teaching; civility and concern for students and colleagues; commitment to value-centered education; and service to students, the institution, and the community. To nominate an outstanding professor, submit an email letter to Dr. Rodney Bragdon <rbragdon@su.edu> within the next week or so. The letter should explain the ways in which the professor meets these criteria: 

  • Must be a full-time SU faculty member, but not necessarily a member of the United Methodist Church. 
  • Must have an exceptional reputation as a teacher in terms of knowledge of the subject, course organization, clarity of instruction, and availability to students. 
  • Is expected to contribute to the welfare of Shenandoah University and to the greater community. 
  • Is expected to show interest in scholarly and professional achievement. Recitals and lectures before learned societies are considered on an equal footing with publications, research, application of professional expertise, or postgraduate study. 
  • Should demonstrate reasonable concern for student welfare in areas beyond the academic. 
  • Collegiality in the candidate shall be defined as cooperation with and respect for colleagues even when there is basis for debate.

Saturday, February 23, 2013

[Archive] Want to Learn About Graduate School and Eat Free Pizza?

Virginia Tech Graduate Center

Attention ALL SU students! Did you ever wonder about graduate school but didn't know how to find out....

How much does it costs? Are there scholarships? How do I apply? What programs would make sense for me? What kind of job could I get afterward?

Next Friday, March 1st, at 5:00 p.m., in HHH 222, are the time and place for answers.

Representatives from the Virginia Tech Graduate School will be in Halpin-Harrison Hall, room 222, next Friday, March 1, starting at 5:00 p.m., to answer your questions about graduate school over free pizza. Click here for a list of Tech's graduate programs.

SU faculty will also be on hand to answer any other questions you mint have, whether about Virginia Tech or not.

All SU students from any major and any academic level are invited. Questions? Email Dr. Michelle Brown at mbrown5@su.edu or visit me in Henkel 218.

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

[Archive] Ceremony Assignment 2/20/13


We have discussed the interrelationships among healing, ceremony, and storytelling in Laguna/Pueblo culture. We will continue exploration of these links in writing today.

Leslie Marmon Silko
Assignment: In a two- to three-paragraph comment to this post, answer this prompt: in his Introduction to Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony, Larry McMurtry says that it has been suggested that Silko's novel be called a "telling" rather than a novel (xxii). What does McMurty mean by "telling"? How does the term "telling" relate to the novel's title? Finally, what is the relationship between telling, ceremony, and healing in relation to Tayo?

You will begin work on this very short essay in class today; you may finish at any time prior to the deadline posted below. Use standard English. Cite textual evidence from Silko's novel. Remember: summarize or paraphrase most evidence and quote only when the exact phrasing is unique or especially important. Your comment may respond to previous comments as long as it otherwise fulfills these assignment criteria. Citation includes in-text citation and a list of Works Cited. See the citation link on this blog for instructions. In order to post a comment here, you must have an online account compatible with Blogspot. You may use either an existing online account, like your SU Gmail account, or set up a new one expressly for online work in this class. You may use whatever online moniker you prefer (barring the offensive) as long as your posts include your name. After the semester is over and final grades issued, you are free to disable any online account you used for this class. This assignment counts as one participation grade and is due by midnight on 2/20/13.

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

[Archive] International Journalist Elizabeth Colton at SU on 2/21

Dr. Elizabeth Colton
Photo: American Committees
on Foreign Relations

Dr. Elizabeth Colton will speak on Thursday, February 21 at 4:00 p.m. in the Byrd Board Room. She will also speak during Dr. Gina Daddario's 2:00 class in HHH 107, which is open to anyone on campus.

Dr. Colton's talk is titled "Diplomacy and the Media: At Home in the World's Hot-Spots."

Dr. Colton taught at the Department of Mass Communication at Shenandoah in the 1990s. She left in 2000 and joined the Foreign Service where she worked as an Officer and Spokesperson at the American Embassy in Riyadh, Algiers, Khartoum, Baghdad and Islamabad.

Before the Foreign Service and Shenandoah, she worked for ABC News, NPR, NBC News, etc. Finally, remember those Iraqi soldiers in the Gulf War who surrendered to a journalist? She was that journalist.

This talk will be of especial interest to students with an interest in international politics, journalism, and the Foreign Service.

Monday, February 11, 2013

[Archive] V-Day +1 = One Billion Rising

This Friday, February 15th, at 1:30 p.m. in the Brandt Student Center, the Women's Studies Program at Shenandoah, the student women's group LIBERATE, and numerous faculty and students are sponsoring ONE BILLION RISING, an event to raise awareness of the fact that one in three women and girls are raped or beaten in their lifetimes. Statistically, that's one billion people worldwide. Will you rise with us? Thanks to Maddie Newell for a great documentary!

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

[Archive] More on Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery"

What a great class discussion we had on "The Lottery," symbol, myth, and allegory! I especially liked the connections you made to other contemporary texts like the novel and film versions of The Hunger Games. Great critical thinking, all of you. An upper level student who overheard our discussion, Julie McGee, thought this pictured passage on scapegoating might be of interest to you, given our discussion's trajectory. Take a look and see if it enhances your understanding of Jackson's story. The sticky note provides the book title. Thanks, Julie!

Monday, January 28, 2013

[Archive] Narrator and Point of View Assignment for Monday, 1/28/13

Due to weather-related closures, please complete the following online assignment today in lieu of meeting in person. We will resume in-person meeting on Wednesday, prepared to discuss this material and begin the next chapter as listed in the syllabus reading schedule.

As we know from our reading, the author's choice of narrator shapes the story's point of view. Assignment: Answer one of the following prompts in one paragraph. Your comment should begin with your first and last names, and by identifying the number of the prompt you're answering. Use standard English. Cite textual evidence from the story you analyze. Remember: summarize or paraphrase most evidence and quote only when the exact phrasing is unique or especially important. Your comment may respond to previous comments as long as it otherwise fulfills these assignment criteria. Citation includes in-text citation and a list of Works Cited. See the citation link on this blog for instructions.
William Faulkner
Edwidge Danticat

1. The narrator of Danticat's story "New York Day Women" uses present tense. What would she have gained or lost by telling her story in past tense?

2. What is the point of view of the italicized passages in Faulkner's "Barn Burning"? What do they teach the reader? What do they add to the story? Do they add irony?

In order to post a comment here, you must have an online account compatible with Blogspot. You may use either an existing online account, like your SU gmail account, or set up a new one expressly for online work in this class. You may use whatever online moniker you prefer (barring the offensive) as long as your posts include your name. After the semester is over and final grades issued, you are free to disable any online account you used for this class. This assignment counts as one participation grade and is due by midnight on 1/29/13.

Monday, January 14, 2013

[Archive] Shenandoah Languages on Facebook

You may know that Dr. Andrea Meador Smith, Assistant Professor of Spanish, SU Languages and Literatures, created and maintains a "Shenandoah Languages" Facebook page on which she posts announcements and links to articles and videos pertinent to literature and language study. I hope you'll take a look!